Archived articles

Science+Technology

Q+A
An optimist's take on dead zones
Published Summer 2021
Ecologist Sarah Preheim discusses dead zones, algae blooms, and working on the Chesapeake Bay / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Project Argo
Published Summer 2021
Inside the oceans, autonomous floats take the temperature and pulse of our changing saltwater world. Two Hopkins alums helped send this fleet on its way. / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Global warming
Currents of change
Published Summer 2021
The complex relationship between climate change and the oceans already affects our lives, and as the planet warms, we haven't seen the worst of it / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Extreme robotics
Deep down below
Published Summer 2021
For almost three decades, Whiting School Professor Louis Whitcomb has developed tools and vehicles that enable oceanographers to explore once-unreachable depths / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Physics pioneer
Published Summer 2021
Physicist Jami Valentine Miller created African American Women in Physics, AAWIP.com, to celebrate her colleagues / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Smart tech
Buoys with a brain
Published Summer 2021
APL's Wayne Pavalko creates custom-designed, 3D-printed buoys that monitor our oceans / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Fluid dynamics
Slick studies
Published Summer 2021
At the Johns Hopkins Laboratory for Experimental Fluid Dynamics, researchers use science to understand oil spills / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Space exploration
Otherworldly oceans
Published Summer 2021
Researchers are almost certain a liquid ocean is hidden beneath the surface of one of Jupiter's moons. The Europa Clipper mission will help determine whether it has all the ingredients necessary for life. / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Vaccines
Will we need a COVID-19 booster?
Published July 1, 2021
In the 'L.A. Times,' Johns Hopkins vaccine expert Kawsar Talaat discusses factors that may determine whether boosters are needed / Los Angeles Times
Student research
Hopkins team earns second place at Collegiate Wind Competition
Published June 30, 2021
In the university's first appearance at the annual competition, the Hopkins Student Wind Energy Team received praise for their miniature dual-rotor, counter-rotating wind turbine