Archived articles

Cardiac health

Cardiac health
AI predicts if and when someone will experience cardiac arrest
Published April 7, 2022
An algorithm built to assess scar patterns in patient heart tissue can predict potentially life-threatening arrhythmias more accurately than doctors can
Public health
Johns Hopkins Children's Center saves newborn with heart condition
Published Feb 22, 2022
The child, Eve McLennan, was born with critical aortic stenosis and had a life-saving surgery when she was two weeks old
Biomedical engineering
New tool predicts sudden death in inflammatory heart disease
Published Aug 2, 2021
Johns Hopkins method outperforms previous approaches for assessing risk in cardiac sarcoidosis
Health Tech
A cardiac patch to the ResQ
Published April 20, 2021
Student-invented device continuously monitors the strength and timing of a heart's electrical activity and sends the data to a patient's caregiver and doctor
Natalia Trayanova elected to National Academy of Inventors
Published Dec 3, 2019
Biomedical engineer recognized for her work developing 3D virtual heart models for patients with irregular heartbeats
Interdisciplinary research
Cardiologists, engineers collaborate
Published Nov 19, 2018
New center will oversee clinical trials of biomedical interventions for treating heart disease developed at Johns Hopkins
Heart health
Western diet and lifestyle raises blood pressure
Published Nov 15, 2018
Study examined two South American tribes—one that has little Western contact and one that has been exposed to Western diet and lifestyle
Heart health
Getting to the heart of cardiac arrhythmia
Published Sept 12, 2018
Computer models help physicians better identify heart tissue to target during cardiac ablation, a procedure to correct irregular heartbeats
Heart health
Understanding preeclampsia
Published Aug 20, 2018
Hopkins researchers close in on the cause of heart failure risk in women with preeclampsia
Years of obesity weigh on heart health
Published Feb 20, 2018
Long-term weight control is crucial for reducing heart disease risk, researchers say