Archived articles

Health

Occupational health
Cab fever
Published Fall 2019
Long-haul trucking is one of the most dangerous professions in America, and Mona Shattell argues more health professionals should meet truckers where they are—on the road / Johns Hopkins Magazine
public health
How best to behead a mosquito
Published Fall 2019
Engineer Russell Taylor and a group of students design a device to make it easier for biotech company Sanaria to develop a malaria vaccine / Johns Hopkins Magazine
New cool tools
Saving lives with a smart stethoscope
Published Fall 2019
Hopkins engineers design a smart stethoscope to address the challenges of diagnosing pneumonia in developing countries / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Health+Wellness
Grad students stay ahead of the stress
Published Sept 12, 2019
Annual Stay Ahead of the Stress Fest has grown to include university and student groups, service animals, and free succulent plants
Mental health
Social media use may pose mental health risks for teens
Published Sept 11, 2019
Social media use by adolescents linked to behaviors that may indicate mental health problems such as social withdrawal and difficulty coping with anxiety or depression
Psychedelics
Johns Hopkins launches center for psychedelic research
Published Sept 4, 2019
The center, believed to be the first and largest of its kind, will use psychedelics to study the mind, identify therapies for diseases such as addiction, PTSD, Alzheimer's
Dual degree
First in her class
Published Aug 27, 2019
Personal experience fuels Johns Hopkins' first MBA/MD student, who overcame leukemia as a child
Aging
Abnormal blood pressure in middle age and later life increases dementia risk
Published Aug 22, 2019
Those with high blood pressure in middle and later life were 49% more likely to develop dementia than those with normal blood pressure at both times
Neuroscience
Deep brain stimulation boosts dopamine
Published Aug 21, 2019
Treatment eases Parkinson's symptoms such as tremors and muscle rigidity
Heart health
Heart simulations that don't miss a beat
Published Aug 19, 2019
In proof-of-concept study of 10 patients with atrial fibrillation, personalized computer models accurately predict where to destroy diseased heart tissue