Archived articles

Natalia trayanova

Cardiac health
AI predicts if and when someone will experience cardiac arrest
Published April 7, 2022
An algorithm built to assess scar patterns in patient heart tissue can predict potentially life-threatening arrhythmias more accurately than doctors can
Biomedical engineering
New heart modeling method may help doctors pump the brakes on sudden cardiac death
Published Jan 25, 2022
Digital, personalized replicas of patients' hearts can help health care providers to better predict who will need implanted defibrillators over time
Natalia Trayanova elected to National Academy of Inventors
Published Dec 3, 2019
Biomedical engineer recognized for her work developing 3D virtual heart models for patients with irregular heartbeats
Heart health
Heart simulations that don't miss a beat
Published Aug 19, 2019
In proof-of-concept study of 10 patients with atrial fibrillation, personalized computer models accurately predict where to destroy diseased heart tissue
Faculty News
Natalia Trayanova receives international recognition
Published June 10, 2019
JHU professor of biomedical engineering is one of five women worldwide to be inducted this year into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame
Interdisciplinary research
Cardiologists, engineers collaborate
Published Nov 19, 2018
New center will oversee clinical trials of biomedical interventions for treating heart disease developed at Johns Hopkins
Heart health
Getting to the heart of cardiac arrhythmia
Published Sept 12, 2018
Computer models help physicians better identify heart tissue to target during cardiac ablation, a procedure to correct irregular heartbeats
Heart health
A healing light?
Published Sept 12, 2016 Video
In lab test, researchers stop lethal heart arrhythmias with gentle light—not harsh electric shocks
Heart health
Assessing arrhythmia risk
Published May 10, 2016
Personalized virtual heart can predict the risk of sudden cardiac death
Risk investment
Innovative ideas rewarded
Published Oct 2, 2013
Two Johns Hopkins scientists receive prestigious NIH biomedical research grants