chemical engineering

Engineering
A promising alternative to traditional heart surgeries
Published June 28, 2019
Researchers develop a lab-grown blood vessel graft from natural polymers with regenerative properties that can be prepped for implantation in a week
Biomolecular engineering
Predicting breast cancer metastasis
Published May 17, 2019
Engineers develop a diagnostic tool and method for identifying aggressive breast cancer cells
Chemical engineering
Developing more flexible nanomaterials can make fuel cell cars cheaper
Published Feb 22, 2019
Scientists manipulate nanomaterials to make them a million times thinner than a strand of hair—dramatically increasing their reactivity
Interdiscplinary scholar
Renowned chemical engineer named BDP
Published Sept 18, 2018
Michael Tsapatsis creates molecular sieve membranes and catalysts to improve industrial efficiency and reduce waste, pollution
Research funding
Major dough for researcher making computers out of yeast
Published July 17, 2018
Biomolecular engineer Rebecca Schulman receives $1.5 million grant to build computer out of biological materials
Biomolecular engineering
A fresh approach to fighting acne
Published May 22, 2018
Student team engineers a face cream that uses a novel approach to control blemishes
Chemical engineering
Mixing metals to create new nanoparticles
Published April 4, 2018
With new technique, researchers create metallic alloy nanoparticles with unprecedented chemical capabilities
Going platinum
Published Spring 2018
Hopkins engineer has come up with a technique to make fuel cells for electric cars cheaper and more effective: coating inexpensive cobalt with a layer of platinum atoms 100,000 times thinner than a strand of hair / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Efficient electricity
Gilded age of electric cars?
Published Dec 19, 2017
Technique makes electric cars more efficient and cost-effective, helping accelerate movement away from fossil fuels
Biochemical engineering
Soft 'smart' robots?
Published Sept 15, 2017
DNA trigger causes hydrogels to change shape, a new way to create robots that don't rely on wires or batteries