Archived articles

Mechanical engineering

The best way to take a pill, according to science
Published Aug 16, 2022
Researchers examining the mechanics of drug dissolution and the natural anatomy of the stomach found that taking a pill while lying on your right side shortens the time it takes for medicine to be absorbed
Sustainability
New project will lay groundwork for open access to massive windfarm simulations
Published July 12, 2022
The creation of a public database will increase accessibility for all users, including academics and engineers who are developing more sustainable energy solutions
Health research
Study reveals kidney cells pump blood
Published May 18, 2022
A new study found that kidney cells pump blood rather than filtering it, aiding in the understanding of kidney physiological function
Engineering
Luke's swing
Published April 25, 2022
Johns Hopkins students design a platform swing that supports the posture and muscle growth of a child with a genetic condition that produces developmental, speech, and attention issues
Engineering
On tap: Less invasive, more precise surgery, performed by a magnetic needle
Published April 22, 2022
Hopkins-led team equips untethered mini-device with ability to tap through tissue using magnetic force
Engineering
A sensor for faster, more accurate COVID-19 tests
Published March 29, 2022
Hopkins researchers say the sensor combines accuracy levels approaching that of PCR testing with the speed of rapid antigen tests, could be used for mass testing at airports, schools, and hospitals
Faculty honors
Jeremy D. Brown, Danielle Speller named Sloan Research Fellows
Published Feb 15, 2022
Jeremy D. Brown and Danielle Speller received Sloan Research Fellowships, which honor exceptional early-career science researchers
Mechanical engineering
New research bursts longstanding theory of bubble behavior
Published Feb 7, 2022
Experiments investigating how bubbles interact with swirls of air or water upend decades-held theory of turbulence research
Robot performs first laparoscopic surgery without human help
Published Jan 26, 2022
In four experiments on pig tissues, the robot excelled at suturing two ends of intestine—one of the most intricate and delicate tasks in abdominal surgery
Avian-inspired engineering
Published Winter 2021
The lightweight, adaptable, irregular structure of bird bones could provide a blueprint for better aerospace and automotive materials / Johns Hopkins Magazine