Team from Johns Hopkins places second at Emory Global Health Case Competition

Team included graduate students from JHU schools of Medicine, Public Health, Nursing, and Business

Image caption: Johns Hopkins team members (from left) Daniel Carnegie, Arielle Slam, Jacob Cox, Hayley Droppert, David Lee, and Abby Dowling.

Image credit: Courtesy Emory Global Health Institute

A team representing Johns Hopkins recently took second place at the 2014 International Emory Global Health Case Competition, which was held last month in Atlanta, Ga.

The event featured 24 teams from across the country and around the world. Each team was required to have members representing at least three different disciplines. The Johns Hopkins team was made up of six graduate students from the schools of Medicine, Public Health, Nursing, and Business. The team members were:

  • Daniel Carnegie, an MPH/MBA student at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Carey Business School
  • Jacob Cox, a first-year medical student at the School of Medicine
  • Abby Dowling, a BSN/MSN student at the School of Nursing
  • Hayley Droppert, an MPH student at the Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • David Lee, a first-year medical student at the School of Medicine
  • Arielle Slam, an MPH/MBA student at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Carey Business School

Participants were tasked with developing recommendations for reforming the World Health Organization. The teams addressed the complex organizational and political issues the WHO faces in an effort to develop reorganization plans that would ensure it is positioned to successfully deal with emerging health issues.

"Being tasked with redesigning the WHO in only four days seemed impossible at first," Droppert said. "But by putting all of our skills and backgrounds together, accompanied by some extremely rapid, targeted learning, our team was able to develop and present a proposal we were incredibly proud of.

"It was a great experience to come together with other schools and smart students who will hopefully be colleagues some day," she added. "Sharing expertise was essential to our success, and I can't think of a better way to bring together the strengths of the Nursing, Medicine, Public Health, and Business schools."

The team was mentored by Anbrasi Edward, an associate scientist in the Health Systems Division of the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Droppert said the guidance of Edward and other faculty members at the four schools was critical to the team's success.

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Tagged global health