Archived articles

Space

Sending heart tissue to space
Published Summer 2023
Johns Hopkins scientists study aging and heart disease by sending heart "tissue-on-a-chip" to space / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Space safety
Hopkins, Carnegie Mellon to co-lead new NASA institute
Published March 16, 2023
The JHU-CMU team is spearheading a Space Technology Research Institute to prevent failure in additively manufactured spaceflight materials
Biomedical engineering
Heart tissue heads to space
Published March 15, 2023
The experiments on the International Space Station aim to inform researchers' understanding and treatment of age-related cardiac problems
U.S. Space Force partnership will prepare leaders for new challenges
Published Oct 26, 2022
Space Force officers, known as Guardians, will be invited to join an interdisciplinary program offering training in international policy with electives in space-focused engineering
Outer space
Stars align for Hubble discovery
Published March 30, 2022
A Johns Hopkins astronomer discovered a new star, which breaks the record for the farthest star ever observed
First-Year Seminar
Contemplating our place in the universe
Published Oct 13, 2021
Luminary faculty members Adam Riess, Andrew Motion engage in wide-ranging discussion ahead of upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope
Q+A
And spaceflight for all
Published Sept 13, 2021
The School of Medicine's Mark Shelhamer discusses SpaceX's upcoming all-civilian Inspiration4 mission and its importance for broadening human access to space
Hopkins retrospective
Moon landing memories
Published July 19, 2019
As the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaches, Johns Hopkins faculty members who watched the momentous event live recall on what it meant to them, and to science
Making space travel safer
Published Summer 2019
As NASA prepares to send humans back to the moon and beyond, Mark Shelhamer and fellow Hopkins scientists want to ensure that future space travelers survive and thrive out there / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Study looks at how astronaut's body changed in space
Published April 11, 2019
JHU's Andrew Feinberg finds that after year-long NASA mission to the International Space Station, astronaut Scott Kelly had no lingering, major epigenetic differences from his earthbound twin, Mark