Archived articles

biomedical engineering

Heart health
Heart simulations that don't miss a beat
Published Aug 19, 2019
In proof-of-concept study of 10 patients with atrial fibrillation, personalized computer models accurately predict where to destroy diseased heart tissue
Fighting cancer by degrees
Published Aug 14, 2019
Hopkins student team engineers device that treats breast cancer by freezing cancerous tissue
Biomedical engineering
Device could expand access to lifesaving breast cancer treatments
Published July 16, 2019
Tissue-freezing probe developed by Hopkins students would offer an affordable, widely available alternative for women in low-resource settings
Cellular snapshots
Study suggests a genetic 'butterfly effect'
Published June 28, 2019
Study examines stem cells as they differentiate into heart muscle cells, finding that small, fleeting genetic mutations can affect disease risk over time
Printing in 4D
Published Summer 2019
Engineers develop origami-inspired implants that grow along with the patient over time / Johns Hopkins Magazine
Hopkins Balloon Project
Rare air
Published May 15, 2019
A team of Johns Hopkins students recently launched cameras and other devices more than 16 miles into the Earth's atmosphere to collect data—and capture stunning pictures
Student design
Student startup wins more than $30K
Published May 14, 2019
Treyetech team wins four prizes at annual Rice Business Plan Competition for their device and procedure that makes corneal transplants easier
Undergraduate research
BME students win $10K prize for young inventors
Published April 24, 2019
Team Ithemba, named after the Zulu word meaning 'hope,' earn Lemelson-MIT award for their low-cost breast cancer screening tool
STEM education
Girl Scouts earn their engineering patch
Published March 27, 2019
Troops from across Maryland design and build roller coasters out of everyday materials with help from Hopkins engineering students
We're one step closer to building an elevator to space
Published Spring 2019
Biology inspires the technology that could allow scientists to build an elevator to space / Johns Hopkins Magazine