Make room on your bookshelves for recent titles authored by JHU faculty

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From a 15th-century Italian painter and ancient verbal arts to 21st-century medical treatments, a wide range of topics is examined in recent books by Johns Hopkins faculty.

Here, we offer a roundup of titles worthy of attention, with descriptions provided by the publishers.

If you're a faculty member and we missed your book—or if you have one being published in the future—please email us at hubatwork@jhu.edu.

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Kriti M. Jain, senior research assistant; David R. Holtgrave, professor and chair of Health, Behavior, and Society; Cathy Maulsby, assistant scientist, co-authors: Improving Access to HIV Care: Lessons From Five U.S. Sites (Johns Hopkins University Press, January 2016)

The availability of combination antiretroviral therapy has changed the lives of millions of people living with HIV (PLWH), for whom a once fatal infection can now be a manageable chronic disease. Yet only 30 percent of PLWH in the United States are virally suppressed, and significant gaps in access to care persist.

While programs to boost linkage to and retention in HIV care are critical to improving the health of PLWH, efforts to evaluate these programs are surprisingly scarce. Using cutting-edge implementation science, this book tackles the issue of how to better link and retain PLWH in ongoing primary medical care. A multipart case study examines successful strategies and provides detailed profiles of the organizations involved and their processes for reaching, linking, and retaining PLWH. Barriers to and facilitators of implementation are explored qualitatively, network analysis is used to assess changes in interagency collaboration among organizations serving PLWH, and evidence-based recommendations are offered for improving linkage to HIV care in the U.S.

Carey Business School

James Calvin, professor, co-editor and contributing writer: Innovative Community Responses to Disaster (Routledge, June 2015) Note: This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Community Development.

Increasingly, community leaders around the world face major natural and economic disasters that require them to find ways to rebuild both physical infrastructure and the local economy. Doing this effectively requires an understanding of how various parts of the community are interconnected, as well as information as to which revitalization approaches have succeeded in the past. Community investment in recovery is essential and, in some cases, may require local leaders to rethink how it can be financed and arranged.

This book presents a conceptual framework based on the community capitals, and describes approaches that have succeeded in situations where local leaders have coordinated efforts to rebuild and revitalize local conditions. Contributions provide examples of successful approaches around the world, thus analysing potential strategies for addressing disasters of many different types in various cultural settings. In this way, the book provides insights into a variety of approaches based on applications of accepted community development theory and concepts.

Cross-Disciplinary

Kathryn Edin, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor in the Krieger School's Department of Sociology and the Bloomberg School's Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, co-author: $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 2015)

Jessica Compton's family of four would have no cash income unless she donated plasma twice a week at her local donation center in Tennessee. Modonna Harris and her teenage daughter Brianna in Chicago often have no food but spoiled milk on weekends.

After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn't seen since the mid-1990s—households surviving on virtually no income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to 1.5 million American households, including about 3 million children.

Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor? Edin has "turned sociology upside down" (Mother Jones) with her procurement of rich—and truthful—interviews. Through the book's many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge.

The authors illuminate a troubling trend: a low-wage labor market that increasingly fails to deliver a living wage, and a growing but hidden landscape of survival strategies among America's extreme poor. More than a powerful exposé, $2.00 a Day delivers new evidence and new ideas to our national debate on income inequality.

Kathleen Sutcliffe, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Carey Business School and the School of Medicine's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety, co-author: Managing the Unexpected: Sustained Performance in a Complex World (Jossey-Bass, 3rd edition, September 2015)

All organizations are challenged by the unexpected—natural disasters, civil unrest, international conflict, extreme economic fluctuations, and other unforeseen crises that affect their ability to function. Why are some organizations better able to endure and adapt when faced with unanticipated obstacles? Understanding how to maintain function when catastrophe strikes is key to keeping any organization viable.

In this thoroughly revised and updated third edition of Managing the Unexpected, Karl E. Weick and Kathleen M. Sutcliffe explore their groundbreaking ideas in light of the unique challenges organizations have been faced with in recent years including bank failures, intelligence failures, quality failures, and other organizational breakdowns, which are often self-inflicted. This vital resource clearly demonstrates why some organizations have the capacity to sustain high performance in the face of unforeseen change. High reliability organizations (HROs) such as commercial aviation, emergency rooms, aircraft carrier flight operations, and firefighting units are looked to as models of exceptional organizational preparedness. Managing the Unexpected, explains how these HROs developed ways of acting and styles of learning that enable them to manage the unexpected better than other organizations.

This updated edition explores the essential elements of high reliability organizing in a variety of settings including banking, museum curating, latent fingerprint identification, aircraft piloting, and automobile manufacturing, and puts the emphasis on the foundational qualities and principles that define HROs. Expanding on the first two editions of their classic work, Weick and Sutcliffe offer an in-depth discussion of the complexity of five basic principles—failure, simplification, operations, resilience, and expertise. As they explain, considerable commitment and competence are necessary, both to deploy these essential principles in the face of the unexpected and to organize around them in order to sustain performance. The revised third edition also contains a broader range of cases that demonstrate how mindful organizing can be directed to enhance sustained reliable performance.

The third edition of Managing the Unexpected is a guide for exploring the various kinds of unexpected events that can unsettle any organization and includes a template that can bolster an organization's ability to anticipate and remain resilient when managing unexpected disruptions.

Krieger School of Arts and Sciences

John Bricuth (pen name of John Irwin, the Decker Professor in the Humanities): Pure Products of America, Inc. (Johns Hopkins University Press, August 2015)

This propulsive narrative poem tells the extended story of the popular born-again televangelist Ray Bob Elray—better known to all his fans as Big Bubba—his twin sons, Nick and Jesse, and his niece and adopted daughter, Donna.

The comic tragedy of Big Bubba's family begins to unfold when he is interviewed by an old friend, country radio disc jockey Charlie Printwhistle. Bubba has come to Waco, Texas, to preach a revival, but soon reveals to Charlie much about his complicated relationship with his family, his ambitions for the ministry, his faith healing, and his most recent venture with Pure Products of America, Inc., which produces and endorses anything "pure," from Bibles to jelly preserves—for a "whopper" of a fee, of course.

Structured as a verse play of two acts composed of three scenes each, Pure Products of America, Inc., follows the unwinding of Bubba's legacy as his heirs fall out and his already slippery relationship with religion is tested by genuine grief. Along the way, master poet John Bricuth treats readers to a sly, sarcastic—and sometimes deeply moving—look at storytelling, old-time religion, and the American way.

Shane Butler, professor, Classics: The Ancient Phonograph (Zone Books, September 2015)

Long before the invention of the phonograph, the written word was unrivaled as a medium of the human voice. In The Ancient Phonograph, Shane Butler takes us back to an age, long before Edison, when writing itself was still relatively new. He meticulously reconstructs a series of Greek and Roman soundscapes ranging from Aristotle to Augustine. Here the real voices of tragic actors, ambitious orators, and singing emperors blend with the imagined voices of lovesick nymphs, tormented heroes, and angry gods. The resonant world we encounter in ancient sources is at first unfamiliar, populated by texts that speak and sing, often with no clear difference between the two. But Butler discovers a commonality that invites a deeper understanding of why voices mattered then, and why they have mattered since.

With later examples that range from Petrarch to Puccini, Mozart to Jimi Hendrix, Butler offers an ambitious attempt to rethink the voice—as an anatomical presence, a conceptual category, and a source of pleasure and wonder. He carefully and critically assesses the strengths and limits of recent theoretical approaches to the voice by Adriana Cavarero and Mladen Dolar and makes a rich and provocative range of ancient material available for the first time to students and scholars in voice studies, sound studies, and media theory. The Ancient Phonograph will appeal not only to classicists but to anyone interested in the verbal arts—literature, oratory, song—and the nature of aesthetic experience.

Stephen Campbell, Henry and Elizabeth Wiesenfeld Professor, History of Art, co-editor: Andrea Mantegna: Making Art (History) (Wiley-Blackwell, Expected publication date: January 2016)

Andrea Mantegna: Making Art (History) presents the art of Mantegna as challenging the parameters of the history of art in the demands it makes upon historical interpretation, and explores the artist's potentially transformative impact on the study of the early Renaissance. [The book] + Features an array of new methodologies for the study of Mantegna and early Renaissance art
+ Critically addresses the question of iconography and "literary" art, as well as the politics of the monographic exhibition
+ Includes translations of two seminal accounts of the artist by Roberto Longhi and Daniel Arasse, key texts not previously available in English
+ Explores Mantegna's potentially transformative impact on the study of the early Renaissance

Hent De Vries, Russ Family Professor in the Humanities, Humanities Center and Department of Philosophy, co-editor: Love and Forgiveness for a More Just World (Columbia University Press, Expected publication date: November 2015)

One can love and not forgive or out of love decide not to forgive. Or one can forgive but not love, or choose to forgive but not love the ones forgiven. Love and forgiveness follow parallel and largely independent paths, a truth we fail to acknowledge when we pressure others to both love and forgive. Individuals in conflict, sparring social and ethnic groups, warring religious communities, and insecure nations often do not need to pursue love and forgiveness to achieve peace of mind and heart. They need to remain attentive to the needs of others, an alertness that prompts either love or forgiveness to respond.

By reorienting our perception of these enduring phenomena, the contributors to this volume inspire new applications for love and forgiveness in an increasingly globalized and no longer quite secular world. With contributions by the renowned French philosophers Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Marion, the poet Haleh Liza Gafori, and scholars of religion (Leora Batnitzky, Nils F. Schott, Hent de Vries), psychoanalysis (Albert Mason, Orna Ophir), Islamic and political philosophy (Sari Nusseibeh), and the Bible and literature (Regina Schwartz), this anthology reconstructs the historical and conceptual lineage of love and forgiveness and their fraught relationship over time. By examining how we have used—and misused—these concepts, the authors advance a better understanding of their ability to unite different individuals and emerging groups around a shared engagement for freedom and equality, peace and solidarity.

Ho-fung Hung, associate professor, Sociology: The China Boom: Why China Will Not Rule the World (Columbia University Press, October 2015)

Many thought China's rise would fundamentally remake the global order. Yet, much like other developing nations, the Chinese state now finds itself in a status quo characterized by free trade and American domination. Through a cutting-edge historical, sociological, and political analysis, Ho-fung Hung details the competing interests and economic realities that temper the dream of Chinese supremacy—forces that are stymieing growth throughout the global South.

Hung focuses on four common misconceptions: that China could undermine orthodoxy by offering an alternative model of growth; that China is radically altering power relations between the East and the West; that China is capable of diminishing the global power of the United States; and that the Chinese economy would restore the world's wealth after the 2008 financial crisis. His work reveals how much China depends on the existing order and how the interests of the Chinese elites maintain these ties. Through its perpetuation of the dollar standard and its addiction to U.S. Treasury bonds, China remains bound to the terms of its own prosperity, and its economic practices of exploiting debt bubbles are destined to fail. Hung ultimately warns of a postmiracle China that will grow increasingly assertive in attitude while remaining constrained in capability.

Jeanne-Marie Jackson, assistant professor, English: South African Literature's Russian Soul: Narrative Forms of Global Isolation (Bloomsbury/Continuum, October 2015)

How do great moments in literary traditions arise from times of intense social and political upheaval? South African Literature's Russian Soul charts the interplay of narrative innovation and political isolation in two of the world's most renowned non-European literatures. In this book, Jeanne-Marie Jackson demonstrates how Russian writing's "Golden Age" in the troubled nineteenth-century has served as a model for South African writers both during and after apartheid. Exploring these two isolated literary cultures alongside each other, the book challenges the limits of "global" methodologies in contemporary literary studies and outdated models of center-periphery relations to argue for a more locally involved scale of literary enquiry with more truly global horizons.

Silvia Montiglio, Basil L. Gilderleeve Professor, Classics: The Spell of Hypnos: Sleep and Sleeplessness in Greek Literature (I.B. Tauris, October 2015)

Sleep was viewed as a boon by the ancient Greeks: sweet, soft, honeyed, balmy, care-loosening, as the Iliad has it. But neither was sleep straightforward, nor safe. It could be interrupted, often by a dream. It could be the site of dramatic intervention by a god or goddess. It might mark the transition in a narrative relationship, as when Penelope for the first time in weeks slumbers happily through Odysseus' vengeful slaughter of her suitors. Silvia Montiglio's imaginative and comprehensive study of the topic illuminates the various ways writers in antiquity used sleep to deal with major aspects of plot and character development. The author shows that sleeplessness, too, carries great weight in classical literature. Doom hangs by a thread as Agamemnon—in Iphigenia in Aulis—paces, restless and sleepless, while around him everyone else dozes on. Exploring recurring tropes of somnolence and wakefulness in the Iliad, the Odyssey, Athenian drama, the Argonautica and ancient novels by Xenophon, Chariton, Heliodorus and Achilles Tatius, this is a unique contribution to better understandings of ancient Greek writing.

Andrew Motion, Homewood Professor of the Arts, Writing Seminars: The New World: A Novel (Crown, July 2015)

Washed ashore after escaping Treasure Island, young Jim Hawkins and his companion Natty find themselves stranded on the Gulf Coast of Texas. Their ship, the Nightingale, has been destroyed, and besides one other crew member, they are the only survivors. Before they can even grasp the full scope of their predicament, they realize they are not alone on the beach. When a band of Native Americans approaches the shore in a threatening fury, they brutally kill Jim and Natty's last shipmate, rob their dead crew, and take the two desperate survivors hostage.

Suddenly, Jim and Natty are thrust into an adventure that takes them all across the unruly American South. Starting with a desperate escape from a violent chief who obsessively keeps close on their trail, they join up with a troupe of entertainers who take them to a thriving and dangerous New Orleans, and seek the closest port so they can set sail for home once again.

In magnificent, free-wheeling prose and in a high-flying style, Andrew Motion has spun a fantastic yarn that will win the hearts of adventure lovers everywhere.

Andrew Motion, Homewood Professor of the Arts, Writing Seminars: Peace Talks (Collection of Poems) (Faber & Faber, November 2015)

The second half of Andrew Motion's new collection returns to the sequence begun in Laurels and Donkeys, completing a body of work recognised by the Wilfred Owen Poetry Award in 2014. These meditations on combat and the people caught up in it look back to conflicts of the past: to the 'war to end all wars'; to Rupert Brooke on his final journey; to Eilfred Own at Craiglockhart War Hospital; to Archduke Franz Ferdinand on the day of his fatal shooting. But Motion also depicts the ravages of modern warfare through reported speech, redacted documents, and vivid evocations of place, his plain understatement bringing the [magnitude] of war home to our own shores.

These poems are moving and measured, delicate and clear-eyed, and bear witness to the futility of war and the suffering of those left behind.

Elsewhere we find biographies in miniature, dreams and visions, family histories, which in their range of forms and voices consider questions of identity, and character. These are poems of remembrance in which Motion's war poems, all in their own way elegies, find a natural partner. Peace Talks is a wise and compassionate work.

Anand Pandian, associate professor, Anthropology, co-author: Reel World: An Anthropology of Creation (Duke University Press, November 2015)

Reel World explores what happens to life when everything begins to look and feel like cinema. Drawing on years of fieldwork with Tamil filmmakers, artists, musicians, and craftsmen in the south Indian movie studios of "Kollywood," Anand Pandian examines how ordinary moments become elements of a cinematic world. With inventive, experimental, and sometimes comical zeal, Pandian pursues the sensory richness of cinematic experience and the adventure of a writing true to these sensations. Thinking with the visceral power of sound and image, his stories also broach deeply philosophical themes such as desire, time, wonder, and imagination. In a spirit devoted to the turbulence and uncertainty of genesis, Reel World brings into focus an ecology of creative process: the many forces, feelings, beings, and things that infuse human endeavors with transformative potential.

Daniel Schlozman, assistant professor, Political Science: [When Movements Anchor Parties: Electoral Alignments in American History] (http://www.amazon.com/When-Movements-Anchor-Parties-International/dp/0691164703/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446229027&sr=1-1&keywords=When+Movements+Anchor+Parties%3A+Electoral+Alignments+in+American+History) (Princeton University Press, September 2015)

Throughout American history, some social movements, such as organized labor and the Christian Right, have forged influential alliances with political parties, while others, such as the antiwar movement, have not. When Movements Anchor Parties provides a bold new interpretation of American electoral history by examining five prominent movements and their relationships with political parties.

Taking readers from the Civil War to today, Daniel Schlozman shows how two powerful alliances—those of organized labor and Democrats in the New Deal, and the Christian Right and Republicans since the 1970s—have defined the basic priorities of parties and shaped the available alternatives in national politics. He traces how they diverged sharply from three other major social movements that failed to establish a place inside political parties—the abolitionists following the Civil War, the Populists in the 1890s, and the antiwar movement in the 1960s and 1970s. Moving beyond a view of political parties simply as collections of groups vying for preeminence, Schlozman explores how would-be influencers gain influence—or do not. He reveals how movements join with parties only when the alliance is beneficial to parties, and how alliance exacts a high price from movements. Their sweeping visions give way to compromise and partial victories. Yet as Schlozman demonstrates, it is well worth paying the price as movements reorient parties' priorities.

Timely and compelling, When Movements Anchor Parties demonstrates how alliances have transformed American political parties.

Erica Schoenberger, professor, Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering and the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute: Nature, Choice and Social Power (Routledge, 2015)

We are at an environmental impasse. Many blame our personal choices about the things we consume and the way we live. This is only part of the problem. Different forms of social power—political, economic and ideological—structure the choices we have available. This book analyses how we make social and environmental history and why we end up where we do.

Using case studies from different environmental domains—earth and water, air and fire—Nature, Choice and Social Power examines the form that social power takes and how it can harm the environment and hinder our efforts to act in our own best interests. The case studies challenge conventional wisdoms about why gold is valuable, why the internal combustion engine triumphed, and when and why suburbs sprawled. The book shows how the power of individuals, the power of classes, the power of the market and the power of the state at different times and in different ways were critical to setting us on a path to environmental degradation. It also challenges conventional wisdoms about what we need to do now. Rather than reducing consumption and shrinking from outcomes we don't want, it proposes growing towards outcomes we do want. We invested massive resources in creating our problems; it will take equally large investments to fix them.

Written in a clear and engaging style, the book is underpinned with a political economy framework and addresses how we should understand our responsibility to the environment and to each other as individuals within a large and impersonal system.

Adam Sheingate, associate professor and chair, Political Science: Building a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy (Oxford University Press, estimated January 2016)

Political races in the United States rely heavily on highly paid political consultants who carefully curate the images of politicians, advise candidates on polling and analytics, and shape voters' perceptions through marketing and advertising techniques. More than half of the $6 billion spent in the 2012 election went to consultants who controlled virtually every aspect of the campaigns, from polling, fundraising, and media to more novel techniques of social media and micro-targeting. These consultants play a central role in political campaigns—determining not only how the public sees politicians, but also how politicians see the public.

In Building a Business of Politics, author Adam Sheingate traces the history of political consultants from its origins in the publicity experts and pollsters of the 1920s and 1930s to the strategists and media specialists of the 1970s who transformed political campaigns into a highly profitable business. Today, consultants command a hefty fee from politicians as they turn campaign cash from special interest groups and wealthy donors into advertisements, polls, and direct mail solicitations characteristic of modern campaigns.

The implications of this system on the state of American democracy are significant: the rise of the permanent campaign brings with it the rise of a permanent campaign industry. A professional political class stands between the voters and those who claim to represent them, influencing messages on both sides. Sheingate not only shows how political consultants have reshaped politics, though; he also covers recent developments like the commercialization of digital campaign tools and the consolidation of the political consulting industry into global media conglomerates. Building a Business of Politics is both a definitive account of the consulting profession and a powerful reinterpretation of how political professionals reshaped American democracy in the modern era.

SAIS

Deborah Brautigam, professor and director of the International Development Program: Will Africa Feed China?* (Oxford University Press, November 2015)

Is China building a new empire in rural Africa? Over the past decade, China's meteoric rise on the continent has raised a drumbeat of alarm. China has 9 percent of the world's arable land, 6 percent of its water, and over 20 percent of its people. Africa's savannahs and river basins host the planet's largest expanses of underutilized land and water. Few topics are as controversial and emotionally charged as the belief that the Chinese government is aggressively buying up huge tracts of prime African land to grow food to ship back to China.

In Will Africa Feed China?, Deborah Brautigam, one of the world's leading experts on China and Africa, probes the myths and realities behind the media headlines. Her careful research challenges the conventional wisdom; as she shows, Chinese farming investments are in fact surprisingly limited, and land acquisitions modest. Defying expectations, China actually exports more food to Africa than it imports. Is this picture likely to change? African governments are pushing hard for foreign capital, and China is building a portfolio of tools to allow its agribusiness firms to "go global." International concerns about "land grabbing" are well-justified. Yet to feed its own growing population, rural Africa must move from subsistence to commercial agriculture. What role will China play? Moving from the halls of power in Beijing to remote irrigated rice paddies of Africa, Will Africa Feed China? introduces the people and the politics that will shape the future of this engagement: the state-owned Chinese agribusiness firms that pioneered African farming in the 1960s and the entrepreneurial private investors who followed them. Their fascinating stories, and those of the African farmers and officials who are their counterparts, ground Brautigam's deeply informative, deftly balanced reporting.

Forcefully argued and empirically rich, Will Africa Feed China? will be a landmark work, shedding new light on China's evolving global quest for food security and Africa's possibilities for structural transformation.

Joe Renouard, resident professor, Hopkins-Nanjing Center: Human Rights in American Foreign Policy From the 1960s to the Soviet Collapse (University of Pennsylvania Press, November 2015)

International human rights issues perpetually highlight the tension between political interest and idealism. Over the last fifty years, the United States has labored to find an appropriate response to each new human rights crisis, balancing national and global interests as well as political and humanitarian impulses.

Human Rights in American Foreign Policy explores America's international human rights policies from the Vietnam War era to the end of the Cold War. Global in scope and ambitious in scale, this book examines American responses to a broad array of human rights violations: torture and political imprisonment in South America; apartheid in South Africa; state violence in China; civil wars in Central America; persecution of Jews in the Soviet Union; movements for democracy and civil liberties in East Asia and Eastern Europe; and revolutionary political transitions in Iran, Nicaragua, and the collapsing USSR.

Joe Renouard challenges the characterization of American human rights policymaking as one of inaction, hypocrisy, and double standards. Arguing that a consistent standard is impractical, he explores how policymakers and citizens have weighed the narrow pursuit of traditional national interests with the desire to promote human rights. Human Rights in American Foreign Policy renders coherent a series of disparate foreign policy decisions during a tumultuous time in world history. Ultimately the United States emerges as neither exceptionally compassionate nor unusually wicked. Rather, it is a nation that manages by turns to be cautiously pragmatic, boldly benevolent, and coldly self-interested.

David A. Steinberg, assistant professor of international political economy: Demanding Devaluation: Exchange Rate Politics in the Developing World (Cornell University Press, June 2015).

Exchange rate policy has profound consequences for economic development, financial crises, and international political conflict. Some governments in the developing world maintain excessively weak and "undervalued" exchange rates, a policy that promotes export-led development but often heightens tensions with foreign governments. Many other developing countries "overvalue" their exchange rates, which increases consumers' purchasing power but often reduces economic growth. In Demanding Devaluation, David Steinberg argues that the demands of powerful interest groups often dictate government decisions about the level of the exchange rate.

Combining rich qualitative case studies of China, Argentina, South Korea, Mexico, and Iran with cross-national statistical analyses, Steinberg reveals that exchange rate policy is heavily influenced by a country's domestic political arrangements. Interest group demands influence exchange rate policy, and national institutional structures shape whether interest groups lobby for an undervalued or an overvalued rate. A country's domestic political system helps determine whether it undervalues its exchange rate and experiences explosive economic growth or if it overvalues its exchange rate and sees its economy stagnate as a result.

I. William Zartman, Jacob Blaustein Professor Emeritus of International Organizations and Conflict Resolution, editor and contributor: Arab Spring: Negotiating in the Shadow of the Intifadat (University of Georgia Press, August 2015).

Beginning in January 2011, the Arab world exploded in a vibrant demand for dignity, liberty, and achievable purpose in life, rising up against an image and tradition of arrogant, corrupt, unresponsive authoritarian rule. These previously unpublished, countryspecific case studies of the uprisings and their still unfolding political aftermaths identify patterns and courses of negotiation and explain why and how they occur.

The contributors argue that in uprisings like the Arab Spring negotiation is "not just a 'nice' practice or a diplomatic exercise." Rather, it is a "dynamically multilevel" process involving individuals, groups, and states with continually shifting priorities—and with the prospect of violence always near. From that perspective, the essayists analyze a range of issues and events—including civil disobedience and strikes, mass demonstrations and nonviolent protest, and peaceful negotiation and armed rebellion—and contextualize their findings within previous struggles, both within and outside the Middle East. The Arab countries discussed include Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen. The Arab Spring uprisings are discussed in the context of rebellions in countries like South Africa and Serbia, while the Libyan uprising is also viewed in terms of the negotiations it provoked within NATO.

Collectively, the essays analyze the challenges of uprisers and emerging governments in building a new state on the ruins of a liberated state; the negotiations that lead either to sustainable democracy or sectarian violence; and coalition building between former political and military adversaries.

School of Education

Laurie deBettencourt, program lead for special education programs, co-author: The Effective Special Education Teacher: A Practical Guide for Success (Waveland Press, paperback edition July 2015)

This comprehensive, pedagogically rich guide aims to help teachers entering the rewarding field of special education become highly successful and competent. The authors' thirty-plus years of experience interacting with teachers and learning their needs endows them with a deep understanding of important issues teachers encounter, as well as their concerns about employing the best teaching methods.

The book's well-structured, easy-to-follow sections are devoted to developing collaborative relationships, preparing individualized educational programs, writing lesson plans, selecting instructional and behavioral techniques, and understanding the teacher evaluation methods in current use today. Guidance is also provided for self-reflection and formulating future goals. Each chapter contains numerous vignettes, rubrics, templates, strategies, and stimulating activities.

School of Medicine

Francis Mark Mondimore, associate professor, Psychiatry, and director of the Moods Disorders Clinic at Bayview Medical Center, co-author: Adolescent Depression: A Guide for Parents (Johns Hopkins University Press, August 2015)

Until recently, psychologists and psychiatrists believed that adolescents did not experience true depression in the way that adults do. Medical experts now realize that young people can and do get seriously depressed, and that depression and bipolar disorder may be more serious and more difficult to treat in adolescents than in adults. Depression may also be harder to recognize as an illness, both because moodiness is considered universal among teenagers and because parents often resist having their child treated for a psychiatric illness that they think―and often hope―will be "just a phase."

In Adolescent Depression: A Guide for Parents, Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Francis Mondimore helps parents understand that serious depression in adolescents is an illness―an illness that can be effectively treated. He describes the many forms of depression and the many ways it can appear in young people―from intensely sad feelings to irritability, anger, and destructive rages. And he answers parents' questions, including: What are the danger signals of serious depression in teenagers? How are mood disorders diagnosed? How do medications work? What about talking therapies? How does depression relate to other problems, such as drug abuse, ADHD, and eating disorders and other self-injurious behavior? Of the one in five adults who go through a period of serious depression during their lifetime, many had their first experience of depression as teenagers. This comprehensive and compassionate guide detailing the symptoms, treatments, complications, and causes of adolescent depression provides parents with the information they need to ensure that their children receive the best possible treatment and become happy and healthy adults.

Vani Rao, associate professor and director of the Brain Injury Clinic and of the Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry Fellowship Program, co-author: The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior After Brain Injury (Johns Hopkins University Press, September 2015)

A traumatic brain injury is a life-changing event, affecting an individual's lifestyle, ability to work, relationships―even personality. Whatever caused it―car crash, work accident, sports injury, domestic violence, combat―a severe blow to the head results in acute and, often, lasting symptoms. People with brain injury benefit from understanding, patience, and assistance in recovering their bearings and functioning to their full abilities.

In The Traumatized Brain, neuropsychiatrists Drs. Vani Rao and Sandeep Vaishnavi―experts in helping people heal after head trauma―explain how traumatic brain injury, whether mild, moderate, or severe, affects the brain. They advise readers on how emotional symptoms such as depression, anxiety, mania, and apathy can be treated; how behavioral symptoms such as psychosis, aggression, impulsivity, and sleep disturbances can be addressed; and how cognitive functions like attention, memory, executive functioning, and language can be improved. They also discuss headaches, seizures, vision problems, and other neurological symptoms of traumatic brain injury.

By stressing that symptoms are real and are directly related to the trauma, Rao and Vaishnavi hope to restore dignity to people with traumatic brain injury and encourage them to ask for help. Each chapter incorporates case studies and suggestions for appropriate medications, counseling, and other treatments and ends with targeted tips for coping. The book also includes a useful glossary, a list of resources, and suggestions for further reading.

Whiting School of Engineering

Scott Donaldson and Stan Siegel, lecturers, Engineering for Professionals, co-authors with others: Enterprise Cybersecurity (Apress, May 2015)

Enterprise Cybersecurity empowers organizations of all sizes to defend themselves with next-generation cybersecurity programs against the escalating threat of modern targeted cyberattacks. This book presents a comprehensive framework for managing all aspects of an enterprise cybersecurity program. It enables an enterprise to architect, design, implement, and operate a coherent cybersecurity program that is seamlessly coordinated with policy, programmatics, IT life cycle, and assessment.

Fail-safe cyberdefense is a pipe dream. Given sufficient time, an intelligent attacker can eventually defeat defensive measures protecting an enterprise's computer systems and IT networks.

To prevail, an enterprise cybersecurity program must manage risk by detecting attacks early enough and delaying them long enough that the defenders have time to respond effectively. Enterprise Cybersecurity shows players at all levels of responsibility how to unify their organization's people, budgets, technologies, and processes into a cost-efficient cybersecurity program capable of countering advanced cyberattacks and containing damage in the event of a breach.

The authors of Enterprise Cybersecurity explain at both strategic and tactical levels how to accomplish the mission of leading, designing, deploying, operating, managing, and supporting cybersecurity capabilities in an enterprise environment. The authors are recognized experts and thought leaders in this rapidly evolving field, drawing on decades of collective experience in cybersecurity and IT. In capacities ranging from executive strategist to systems architect to cybercombatant, Scott E. Donaldson, Stanley G. Siegel, Chris K. Williams, and Abdul Aslam have fought on the front lines of cybersecurity against advanced persistent threats to government, military, and business entities.

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