COVID-19 information and resources for JHU

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Johns Hopkins University is actively monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic, with particular focus on the health and well-being of the university community, as well as on the continuity of university operations. This website is updated daily, and all members of the JHU community are advised to check back regularly for new information.

What you need to know

Last updated April 4, 10:45 a.m.

► All in-person classes are suspended through the end of the spring 2020 semester, JHU President Ronald J. Daniels announced in a message to the Hopkins community on March 18.

► Remote/virtual instruction for all students is in effect as of March 23. More information on university operations »

► All academic divisions, in consultation with the Provost’s Office, have taken steps to expand the use of pass/fail grading for the spring 2020 term More information on grading policies »

► The university has created online resources with information and updates related to undergraduate student services and universitywide and school-specific resources relevant to graduate students.

► Online and virtual teaching support is available for all faculty, lecturers, and TAs via the Keep Teaching @ JHU website.

► While the university remains open, telework is the first choice and priority for as many employees as possible, in accordance with Maryland’s stay-at-home order. Employees should be on site only when performing essential tasks; essential employees will receive documentation of their status. More HR guidance »

► Access to all campus buildings is restricted—buildings are locked and require key card swipes for entry or will have a staffed on-site security station. More information »

► All on-campus research is restricted to essential activities only. More information »

► The May 2020 universitywide Commencement exercises will be held virtually; all in-person Commencement ceremonies are canceled.

► All in-person university events are suspended until further notice, including tours, admissions events, athletics events, and alumni events.

► University meetings and work activities, even those deemed essential, must be conducted remotely whenever possible; no in-person meetings or activities may be held with more than 10 people (with limited exceptions, such as select types of clinical care).

► Residential undergraduate students are required to leave campus and have been provided support to do so. A small number of students have been granted specific exceptions allowing them to stay. More information for undergraduate students »

► All Sheridan Libraries buildings are closed. More information on libraries »

NEW University and health system shuttles and buses continue to run on a modified schedule due to a reduced number of riders, and additional schedule changes will take effect beginning Sunday, April 5.

► The Weinberg Early Childhood Center and the Homewood Early Learning Center are currently closed, in accordance with Maryland public schools schedule. The Johns Hopkins Child Care and Early Learning Center at East Baltimore remains open.

► Nonessential university-sponsored international and domestic travel is suspended. Additional travel guidance »

► Undergraduate participation in spring 2020 study abroad programs has been suspended worldwide, and some summer 2020 programs have been suspended as well. More on international impacts »

NEW There have been 3,125 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 22,485 negative tests, and 53 related deaths in Maryland; there have been 902 confirmed cases and 21 deaths in Washington, D.C.

► Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has issued a stay-at-home order for all Marylanders, effective at 8 p.m. on Monday, March 30. No one should leave their home for any reason other than essential work or other limited essential activities. More information »

► Guidance for preventing the spread of illness includes: wash your hands frequently, cough/sneeze into your elbow, stay home if you have illness accompanied by fever, and practice social distancing.

NEW As of April 3, the CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators—those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for health care workers and other medical first responders. More information »

► If you feel ill, contact the Employee COVID-19 Call Center (employees, post-docs, house staff), or University Health Services or the Student Health and Wellness Center (students). More information »

Health resources

Your health and the health of our community is our primary concern. It is especially important we all take seriously the advice of public health experts for maximizing our own health and the health of others:

  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Cough/sneeze into your elbow
  • Get this season’s flu shot if you haven’t already

Social distancing

To slow the spread of COVID-19, public health experts encourage social distancing, a practice designed to keep sick individuals from coming in contact with healthy ones in order to limit opportunities for transmission. The CDC recommends avoiding large gatherings and crowds, and maintaining a distance of approximately six feet from others.

The Hub has published a social distancing overview that explores how the practice can “flatten the curve” and help prevent surges in illness that have the potential to overwhelm health care systems and lead to increased loss of life.

Use of masks

Recent studies show that a significant portion of individuals with novel coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. In light of this new evidence, the CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators—those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for health care workers and other medical first responders.
Additionally, all Johns Hopkins Medicine employees are required to wear a surgical, procedural, or cloth face mask while working in any Johns Hopkins Medicine facility. More information »

COVID-19 information for employees

Employees should follow the university sick leave policy and notify your manager if you are sick. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, call 911. If you begin having symptoms of COVID-19 or you are worried that you were exposed, call our Employee COVID-19 Call Center at 443-287-8500, seven days a week, between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m.

COVID-19 testing for students

University Health Services and the Student Health and Wellness Center are only ordering tests for those who meet the criteria set by Johns Hopkins Infection Control. These criteria continue to be updated on a regular basis as the pandemic progresses. We will use the most current criteria for testing when you are assessed over the phone.

If it is determined, based on the criteria, to administer a COVID-19 test, it could take up to 24 hours to arrange for the test during the weekday. If your test is being ordered on a weekend, you will be contacted on the next business day to arrange testing. Given the demand for tests, it is taking an average of two to five days to get results.

More health info and resources

University operations

The university has assembled a multidisciplinary team from across the institution to identify and plan for a range of scenarios and potential near- and longer-term COVID impacts.

At this time:

  • All in-person classes will continue as remote/virtual instruction for the rest of the semester, with remote/virtual instruction beginning in full for all students on March 23.
  • All in-person, university events are suspended pending further notice, including tours, admissions events, and alumni events.
  • All academic divisions, in consultation with the Provost’s Office, have taken steps to expand the use of pass/fail grading for the spring 2020 term
  • Online and virtual teaching support is being made available for all faculty, lecturers, and TAs.
  • Access to all campus buildings is restricted—buildings are locked and require key card swipes for entry or will have a staffed on-site security station.
  • The May 2020 universitywide Commencement exercises will be held virtually (all in-person Commencement ceremonies are cancelled). We will work with our divisions and students on plans to gather our graduates together for virtual ceremonies this May and in-person celebrations at a later date.
  • University meetings and work activities, even those deemed essential, must be conducted remotely whenever possible, and no in-person meetings or activities may be held with greater than 10 people.
  • Nonessential university-sponsored international and domestic travel is suspended.
  • We are winding down all but critical research, transitioning to telework for as much of our work force as possible, and providing emergency COVID-19 leave for our employees.

More on university operations

Travel guidance

  • All nonessential university-sponsored travel (both international and domestic) is suspended.
  • Essential travel may include time-critical research, clinical care delivery, and/or clinical trials, as determined by the dean or his/her designee.
  • University-sponsored travel includes all travel funded by the university or its sponsors, including discretionary funds, and all travel sponsored or organized by student organizations, regardless of the funding source.
  • All personal travel is strongly discouraged—international and domestic—and may be prohibited for certain employees (e.g., the health care workforce).

More travel guidance

Additional information

International impacts at JHU

Updates on study abroad, operations at SAIS Nanjing and SAIS Europe, and the immigration implications of COVID-19

Mental health resources

Information for members of our who may need additional support amid the global coronavirus outbreak

Supporting an inclusive community

Learn more about the university’s discrimination and harassment policies and procedures

Coronavirus myths+facts

Tips to help keep you and your community safe (PDF)

 

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